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Stop being a boss, and start being a leader - Blog

Stop being a boss, and start being a leader

Every business has a boss or owner, but whether or not that person is a leader as well, is an entirely different discussion. Whilst the two may be similar in some ways, they are essentially two different things, and at the end of the day, it’s up to you whether you act like a boss or like a leader.

Every business has a boss or owner, but whether or not that person is a leader as well, is an entirely different discussion. Whilst the two may be similar in some ways, they are essentially two different things, and at the end of the day, it’s up to you whether you act like a boss or like a leader. There’s no denying that in the fast-paced world of business that exists today, it’s a challenge for business owners to channel their inner leaders, but if you make the effort to lead rather than boss, chances are you’ll find your team performing better and enthusiasm levels increasing. Here are some tips on how you can stop being a boss, and start being a leader.

Leaders lead, bosses rule

As the leader of a business, it’s your job to be by your team’s side, leading them forwards and moving along with them. You’re not there just to oversee – a true leader gets involved and is in the trenches together with everyone else, setting an example and leading with strength. They coach people towards their best performance and drive them to succeed every day. Essentially, it’s about the “we” and not the “I”.

Leaders motivate, bosses frighten

Team members are far more likely to do a good job and complete projects successfully if they’re motivated to do so. This is where a leader steps in – he inspires and motivates the people within the business, something that will inevitably lead to high levels of enthusiasm. When people are feeling enthusiastic and excited about something, they are far more likely to put more effort into it, thus performing at their best. As a business owner, you should aim to encourage your employees instead of instilling fear in them. Fear does not equate respect.

Leaders listen, bosses command

There will be times when the head of a business has to give orders to others, but for the rest of the time, an effort should be made to listen. By listening to what others have to say, it automatically shows that you value them and care about their opinions. Feedback and discussion should be welcomed and encouraged by every business leader because in that way, people are far more likely to feel appreciated and their confidence in you as a leader will only be strengthened.

Leaders teach/learn, bosses expect

A true leader acknowledges the value in learning from others and the fact that there’s always something new to learn. He is able to put ego aside and absorb relevant information from a range of different sources. Leaders pay attention to what their colleagues have to say and are more than happy to share their experience and knowledge with others as well. The relationship between a leader and his employees is a two-way street: it is about give and take, not just take.

Leaders help repair damage, bosses blame

As we’ve mentioned already, leaders are those who take the initiative and dive right in alongside their colleagues. They become part of the solution, rather than blaming others for the problems. When it comes to being a strong leader, it’s not about throwing your hands up in the air or pointing a finger, but rather about being proactive and helping those around you to repair any damage. A leader is part of the team and not just the representative for it.

If you run your own small business, strive to be a leader rather than just a boss – people will respond better to you and as a result, perform at their optimum and help lead your business to success.

Many business leaders trust Sage One, a leader in the online accounting and payroll software industry, when it comes to managing their business optimally. Contact Sage One today to find out more about its range of impressive products and how it can help you achieve greatness as a small business leader.

 

Featured image: http://www.inc.com